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Spectrum and Wireless


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Press Releases

Broadcast Spectrum is not the only Spectrum Available

The U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee is holding an oversight hearing this week to examine the Federal Communications Commission’s progress in planning its upcoming spectrum incentive auction. The Commission expects the auction to contribute 120 MHz of broadcast spectrum to the goal of an additional 300 MHz for mobile broadband by 2015 established by the FCC’s National Broadband Plan. While the incentive auction is important and deserves the attention it is receiving from the commission and Congress, attention should also be paid to another category of spectrum: the Mobile Satellite Service (MSS) spectrum. This is the most immediately available spectrum – indeed, the only significant block of spectrum that is already licensed but not deployed. Since considerable doubt exists concerning whether the incentive auction will yield anything close to the projected 120 MHz, the commission might get more “bang for the buck” by focusing greater attention on removing the remaining impediments to the deployment of the MSS spectrum.

Press Releases

MSS Spectrum is “Most Available” Spectrum for Broadband Plan Goals

The mobile satellite service (MSS) spectrum is the spectrum most immediately available for meeting the Federal Communications Commission’s National Broadband Plan goals, explain Thomas Lenard and Lawrence White in “The Spectrum Crunch, MSS Spectrum and LightSquared,” released today by the Technology Policy Institute. To help reach its goal, the agency should grant LightSquared’s request to modify its spectrum license and allow the company to move forward with its 4G-LTE network.

Press Releases

Event – The Spectrum Crunch: Causes and Solutions

In his recent paper, “Is There Really a Spectrum Crisis? Quantifying the Factors Affecting Spectrum License Value,” TPI’s Scott Wallsten found that spectrum auction prices increased from 2007 – 2011, suggesting that demand for wireless services outpaced technological improvements in spectrum usage and increases in spectrum supply. Both the Federal Communications Commission and Congress have made moving spectrum into the market a priority. Are the proposed spectrum auctions and release of spectrum for unlicensed uses enough to ease the “crunch”?

Press Releases

Event – The Spectrum Crunch: Causes and Solutions

In his recent paper, “Is There Really a Spectrum Crisis? Quantifying the Factors Affecting Spectrum License Value,” TPI’s Scott Wallsten found that spectrum auction prices increased from 2007 – 2011, suggesting that demand for wireless services outpaced technological improvements in spectrum usage and increases in spectrum supply. Both the Federal Communications Commission and Congress have made moving spectrum into the market a priority. Are the proposed spectrum auctions and release of spectrum for unlicensed uses enough to ease the “crunch”?

Press Releases

Spectrum Prices have Increased over Past Four Years

Spectrum license values have steadily increased over the past five years, explains Scott Wallsten in “Is There Really a Spectrum Crisis? Quantifying the Factors Affecting Spectrum License Value.” From 2007 to 2011, spectrum auction prices in terms of dollars per MHz-pop increased, suggesting that demand for wireless services outpaced technological improvements in spectrum usage. Therefore, Wallsten advises, “The FCC and NTIA should continue to move spectrum into the market and ensure that spectrum already available be able to move smoothly and efficiently through secondary transactions.”

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