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What Comes After Emergence? Research Roundup, December 2018.

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*The Research Roundup is a semi-regular list of outside research we have found interesting and think is worth sharing. The views and conclusions of the papers’ authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions of anyone affiliated with TPI. The information below includes edited author abstracts* In the last decade an incredible number of new technologies and applications have hit the manufacturing and consumer markets. Though perhaps still “emerging,” technologies such as autonomous vehicles, blockchain technology, and smart sensor consumer products have been attracting new users and applications. Consumer familiarity, acceptance, and […]

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What Do Ten Thousand Economists Talk About?

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The American Social Science Associations (ASSA) 2019 annual meetings took place over three days this past weekend in Atlanta. The annual meetings always include more than ten thousand PhD economists, finance scholars, and journalists gathered in the ultimate Nerdfest, as one financial journalist dubbed it. Most of the world paid attention only when Federal Reserve Chair Jay Powell announced in a speech on Friday morning that the Fed will exercise discretion in rate hikes after a difficult December. Stock markets rebounded ending the day up 3.3% on January 4. But […]

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The Law and Economics of Apple Inc. v. Pepper

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The Supreme Court wrestled with the economics of the “app economy” in recent oral arguments in the case of Apple Inc. v. Pepper. The justices raised dozens of questions about the supply and demand of products and services in a multi-sided market consisting of consumers, developers, and platforms. The legal question before the Court was who has standing to sue for antitrust injury from an app store’s commission on app sales charged to developers. The economics questions, however, are much broader. For example, how much of a fee charged by […]

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Technology and Innovation in Daily Life. Research Roundup November, 2018

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*The Research Roundup is a semi-regular list of outside research we have found interesting and think is worth sharing. The views and conclusions of the papers’ authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions of anyone affiliated with TPI. The information below includes edited author abstracts* Wherever we look, emerging technologies are changing some aspect of our day-to-day, be it how we absorb media or how we navigate traffic or how we manufacture and disseminate consumer goods. This month’s research roundup highlights the diversity and ubiquity of emerging tech. It features articles […]

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AI, Blockchain, Privacy and More: Leveraging Benefits, Mitigating Risks. Research Roundup October 2018

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*The Research Roundup is a semi-regular list of outside research we have found interesting and think is worth sharing. The views and conclusions of the papers’ authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions of anyone affiliated with TPI. The information below includes edited author abstracts*   This month’s research roundup focuses on technologies and innovation in modern life. New technologies can yield large benefits to society, but those benefits may be highly concentrated. Researchers like Arnaud Costinot and Iván Werning consider how public policies might address such inequality while ensuring continued […]

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“Music Licensing after the Music Modernization Act with Mitch Glazier and David Israelite” (Two Think Minimum Podcast)

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Two Think Minimum Podcast Transcript Episode 014: “Music Licensing after the Music Modernization Act with Mitch Glazier and David Israelite” Recorded on: October 30, 2018 Scott: Hi, and welcome to TPI’s podcast, Two Think Minimum. Today is Tuesday, October 30th, 2018, and I’m Scott Wallsten, president and senior fellow of the Technology Policy Institute, here with Tom Lenard, senior fellow and president emeritus of TPI. We’ll be chatting with Mitch Glazier, who is president of the Recording Industry Association of America, and David Israelite, President and CEO of the National […]

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“How Russian Twitter Trolls Influence Society and Elections with Patrick Warren” (Two Think Minimum Podcast)

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Two Think Minimum Podcast Transcript Episode 013: “How Russian Twitter Trolls Influence Society and Elections with Patrick Warren” Recorded on: October 29, 2018 Sarah: Welcome back to TPI’s Podcast Two Think Minimum. It’s Monday, October 29th, 2018, and I’m Sarah Oh, a research fellow at the Technology Policy Institute. Today, we’re excited to talk with Patrick Warren, who has a Ph.D. in economics from MIT and is now an Associate Professor of Economics at Clemson University. Patrick studies how organizations work – organizations including companies, bureaucracies, parties, even armies. Patrick’s […]

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Bitcoin, the Internet of Things, Privacy, Robots, and More. Research Roundup September 2018

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*The Research Roundup is a semi-regular list of outside research we have found interesting and think is worth sharing. The views and conclusions of the papers’ authors do not necessarily reflect the opinions of anyone affiliated with TPI. The information below includes edited author abstracts*   This month’s Research Roundup includes new research on the integration of emerging technologies into daily life. “Scheduling last-mile deliveries with truck-based autonomous robots” by Nils Boysen, Stefan Schwerdfeger, and Felix Weidinger discusses the challenges and potential benefits of combining human-driven and autonomous vehicles in delivery systems on […]

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“Victoria Graham on Antitrust and Corporate Crime Journalism” (Two Think Minimum Podcast)

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Two Think Minimum Podcast Transcript Episode 012: “Victoria Graham on Antitrust and Corporate Crime Journalism” Recorded on: September 27, 2018   Sarah:  Hi and welcome back to TPI’s podcast Two Think Minimum. It’s Thursday, September 27, 2018, and I’m Sarah Oh, a research fellow at the Technology Policy Institute. Today we’re excited to talk with Victoria Graham, a journalist with Bloomberg. Victoria Graham as an antitrust and corporate crime reporter for Bloomberg Law in Washington, covering news and trends with the Justice Department, Securities and Exchange Commission, and the Federal […]

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Home internet access for low-income household helps people manage time, money, and family schedules

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Low-income people may face a “bandwidth tax.” This tax is not necessarily part of the digital divide and is not a reference to the internet at all. Instead, it refers to the phenomenon of not being able to focus on long-term goals because so much cognitive effort is spent simply figuring out how to make ends meet in the short run. But perhaps internet bandwidth could help mitigate the “bandwidth tax.” Could home broadband access help ease the tax burden by giving low-income people a tool to better manage time […]

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