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DOJ Proposal May Result in Four Competitors While Avoiding Possibility of Only Two

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In a Tunney Act filing, “Preserving Wholesale/Resale Competition and Reducing Barriers to Future Facilities-Based Competition,” TPI President and Senior Fellow Scott Wallsten, weighs in with more original analysis of the proposed T-Mobile-Sprint Merger. Testifying before a House Judiciary panel on the combination in March, Wallsten deflated the 4-3 merger arguments deployed by many merger critics, stating that little evidence supported a challenge of the merger. But he raised concerns about the companies’ “outsize shares” in wholesale and resale markets potentially harming low-income customers who tend to prepay for wireless. The […]

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“BigID CEO Dimitri Sirota Brings Fresh Ideas to Privacy Debate” (Two Think Minimum)

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Two Think Minimum Podcast TranscriptEpisode 024: “BigID CEO Dimitri Sirota Brings Fresh Ideas to Privacy Debate” Recorded on: August 20th, 2019 Sarah Oh: Hi and welcome back to TPI’s podcast, Two Think Minimum. It’s Tuesday, August 20, 2019 and we’re here in Aspen, Colorado at the 2019 TPI Aspen Forum. I’m Sarah Oh, Senior Fellow at the Technology Policy Institute. Today we’re excited to talk with Dimitri Sirota, CEO and cofounder of BigID. Dimitri is the CEO of one of the first enterprise privacy management platforms called BigID and a privacy and […]

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“Former FTC Chair Timothy Muris and Jonathan Nuechterlein Discuss Antitrust in the Internet Era” (Two Think Minimum)

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Two Think Minimum Podcast TranscriptEpisode 023: “Former FTC Chair Timothy Muris and Jonathan Nuechterlein Discuss Antitrust in the Internet Era” Recorded on: September 24th, 2019 Scott Wallsten: Hi and welcome back to TP’Is podcast, Two Think Minimum. It’s Tuesday, September 24th and I’m Scott Wallsten, President and Senior fellow at the Technology Policy Institute. Today we’re excited to talk with Tim Muris and John Nuechterlein. Tim Muris is a former chairman of the Federal Trade Commission and currently at George Mason University Foundation Professor of Law at the Scalia Law School […]

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Economics, Experts, and Federalism in Mozilla v. FCC

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Read this blog post in our new TPInsights newsletter! In Mozilla v. FCC, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit addressed dozens of questions of law, technology, and economics in its 186-page opinion on the lawfulness of the FCC’s 2018 Restoring Internet Freedom rulemaking. The Court upheld the FCC’s decision to return to its earlier classification of broadband Internet access service as an “information service” under Title I of the Telecommunications Act of 1996.[1] This TPInsight provides important insights into how courts consider economic analysis, competing experts, and […]

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TPI’s Two Think Minimum Podcast

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Two Think Minimum, TPI’s podcast, is reaching cruising speed with excellent guests and smart takes on newsworthy technology policy issues.  In fact, it appears to be making news, gaining ear-share and helping to advance the policy debate. We haven’t changed the recipe: recruit excellent, provocative guests and engage them on policy issues that matter, post the result, and repeat. With recent guests like CNBC business anchor Brian Sullivan, Needham and Company’s Laura Martin and former FTC chairmen, Tim Muris and William Kovacic, our job was easy. If anything has changed, […]

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“Former FTC Chairman William Kovacic on the Future of the FTC and Antitrust” (Two Think Minimum Podcast)

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Two Think Minimum Podcast TranscriptEpisode 022: “Former FTC Chairman William Kovacic on the Future of the FTC and Antitrust“Recorded on: September 11, 2019 Scott Wallsten: Hi and welcome back to TPI’s podcast, Two Think Minimum. It’s Wednesday, September 11th, 2019. I’m Scott Wallsten, President and Senior Fellow at the Technology Policy Institute. Today we’re excited to talk with Bill Kovacic. Professor Kovacic is the Global Competition Professor of Law and Policy, Professor of Law, and Director of the Competition Law Center at George Washington University Law School. He has years […]

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“eSports, Content, and Privacy with Brian Sullivan and Laura Martin” (Two Think Minimum Podcast)

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Two Think Minimum Podcast TranscriptEpisode 021: “eSports, Content, and Privacy with Brian Sullivan and Laura Martin”Recorded on: August 20, 2019 Brian Sullivan of CNBC and Laura Martin of Needham & Company sit down with Scott Wallsten in this episode recorded in Aspen, Colorado at the Technology Policy Institute’s annual Aspen Forum on August 18-20, 2019. Brian, Laura, and Scott discuss a wide range of topics from eSports, content, and privacy. Brian and Laura discuss their perspectives on the growing influence of Washington, D.C. on business decisions on Wall Street and […]

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OTI’s Broadband Map Could Be Useful If They Understood Their Data

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Introduction The New America Foundation’s Open Technology Initiative (OTI) recently released a report titled, “The United States of Broadband Map: Mapping the Gulf Between What ISPs Report and Actual Internet Speeds.” OTI introduces the map: “Are people getting the internet speeds they pay for? Our new map finds a surprising gulf between what ISPs report and actual internet speeds.” The map compares the median bandwidth consumers receive in a given area to the speeds ISPs report to the FCC as being available. Their thesis seems to be that people generally […]

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“Big Tech and Antitrust: A Discussion With Randal Picker” (Two Think Minimum Podcast)

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Two Think Minimum Podcast TranscriptEpisode 020: “Big Tech and Antitrust: A Discussion With Randal Picker”Recorded on: July 16, 2019 Randal Picker is the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law at the University of Chicago Law School, Senior Fellow at the Computation Institute of the University of Chicago Argonne National Laboratory, and affiliate faculty with the Coase-Sandor Institute for Law and Economics. Professor Picker currently teaches classes at the Law School in Secured Transactions and Antitrust and a seminar on antitrust and intellectual property policy. In prior years, Professor […]

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Huawei: Security Risk, Bargaining Chip or Both?

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A recent Gizmodo headline poses the question everyone seems to be asking lately, “Wait, What the Hell Is Going on With Huawei Now?” In an apparent policy reversal, President Trump said U.S. companies may be able to sell at least some software and components to the Chinese telecom equipment and electronics giant, despite the recent ban on such activity.  Details remain murky, but administration officials suggested later that only general-purpose products which pose no security threats are on the list. Trump’s remarks came shortly after he met with Chinese President […]

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