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Research Roundup for August 2020

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Welcome back to TPI’s Research Roundup, our semi-regular compilation of recent outside research of interest to tech policy nerds.  Papers this month include studies on internet adoption, machine learning, Uber Eats, e-commerce, and cryptocurrencies. If you’ve read a paper you think might be interesting to include in the next roundup, feel free to send it to nlovin@techpolicyinstitute.org DISCLAIMER: The papers and authors are not affiliated with TPI. We do not necessarily agree with everything, or even anything, in these papers, but find them interesting and informative. Predicting Cell Phone Adoption Metrics Using Satellite […]

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“Google Cloud Developer Advocate Felipe Hoffa” (Two Think Minimum)

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Sarah Oh: Hello. Welcome back to the Technology Policy Institute’s podcast, Two Think Minimum. It’s Thursday, July 30th, 2020. I’m Sarah Oh, senior fellow at TPI, and I’m joined by Scott Wallsten and Nathaniel Lovin. Today, we’re delighted to talk to Felipe Hoffa, developer advocate, and software engineer at Google. Felipe is originally from Chile and is now based in San Francisco and around the world. If you’re involved in big data and data science, you may recognize him as a familiar name and face answering thousands of developer questions […]

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President Trump vs. Integrity and Independence

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Presidents often interfere in the workings of supposedly “independent” agencies. President Obama publicly expressed his preference for how the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) should regulate broadband. President Reagan reportedly met secretly with then FCC Chairman Mark Fowler about the Commission’s “Financial Interest and Syndication Rules.” And chairs are frequently personal friends of the president who appointed them. But those examples are all “tan suit scandals” compared to President Trump’s abrupt withdrawal of FCC Commissioner Michael O’Rielly’s (re)nomination. While the president provided no reason, it is widely understood that the president […]

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“TikTok Public Policy’s Michael Beckerman” (Two Think Minimum)

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This interview with Michael Beckerman was recorded on Monday, July 27th. A lot has changed for TikTok since, with the President’s threat to ban the app if TikTok doesn’t divest it’s US opererations from it’s parent company before September 15th. The contents of the interview are still release and so we’re bringing it to you now on August 5th. Tom Lenard: Hello, and welcome back to TPI’s podcast, Two Think Minimum. It’s Monday, July 27th, and I’m Tom Lenard, President Emeritus and Senior Fellow at the Technology Policy Institute. And […]

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“Jay Bhattacharya on Health Economics and Coronavirus” (Two Think Minimum)

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Scott: Hello and welcome to the Technology Policy Institute’s podcast: Two Think Minimum. Today is July 23rd, 2020, and I’m Scott Wallsten, president and senior fellow at TPI here with my cohost, TPI Senior Fellow and President Emeritus, Tom Lenard. Today, we’re excited to be talking with Jay Bhattacharya. Jay is a professor of medicine at Stanford university. He is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economics Research, a Senior Fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and at the Stanford Freeman Spogli Institute. He holds […]

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Research Roundup for Early Summer 2020

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Welcome back to TPI’s Research Roundup, our semi-regular compilation of recent outside research of interest to tech policy nerds. They’re not quite beach reads, but it’s not quite beach time anyways. If you’ve read a paper you think might be interesting to include in the next roundup, feel free to send it to nlovin@techpolicyinstitute.org DISCLAIMER: The papers and authors are not affiliated with TPI. We do not necessarily agree with everything, or even anything, in these papers, but find them interesting and informative. The Electric Telegraph, News Coverage, and Political Participation by […]

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“Section 230 Series: Center for Democracy & Technology’s Alexandra Givens” (Two Think Minimum)

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Scott Wallsten: Today, we’re delighted to speak with Alexandra Givens, President and CEO of the Center for Democracy and Technology. Prior to CDT, Alexandra taught at Georgetown Law School where she founded the Institute for Technology Law and Policy and led Georgetown’s Tech Scholars Program. She was also a founding leader of Georgetown’s Initiative on Tech and Society. She previously served as Chief Counsel for IP and Antitrust on the Senate Judiciary Committee working for its then Chairman and Ranking Member, Senator Patrick Leahy. She developed legislative and oversight strategy […]

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“Section 230 Series: Eric Goldman on Section 230 Misunderstandings” (Two Think Minimum)

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Sarah Oh: Hello, welcome back to the Technology Policy Institute’s podcast Two Think Minimum. It’s Tuesday, June 16, 2020, and I’m Sarah Oh, Senior Fellow at TPI, and I’m joined by Scott Wallsten, TPI’s President. Today, we’re delighted to kick off a series of podcasts on Section 230. Our first guest is Eric Goldman. Eric is a professor of law at Santa Clara University School of Law. He co-directs the High Tech Law Institute. He’s on a short list of North American IP thought leaders and has been named an […]

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“Robert Shea on Evidenced Based Policy’s Impact and Potential” (Two Think Minimum)

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Bob Hahn: Good morning, my name is Bob Hahn and I’m a Senior Fellow at the Technology Policy Institute. It’s my pleasure this morning to be interviewing my good friend and colleague Robert Shea. Robert played an important role as a commissioner on the Evidence Based Policy Commission, where he had the misfortune of serving with me. Notwithstanding that, he worked on this commission very hard, and we’re going to talk a little bit about the commission today. Prior to that, he chaired the National Academy of Public Administration, which […]

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Who is Responsible for This? A TPI Podcast Series on Section 230

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The confluence of a looming election, concerns about misinformation, fears of being excluded from popular platforms, a presidential executive order, and proposals for new legislation have provoked a hornets’ nest around Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which limits the civil liability of online intermediaries for what is posted on their properties. In a series of podcast episodes, fellows at TPI will interview leading scholars of Section 230 to unpack the legal and economic questions facing policymakers today. We will discuss the history of the statute, legislative proposals, politics, […]

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