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Posts by Thomas M. Lenard


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Press Releases

Thomas Lenard and Lawrence J. White submitted their recent study, “ICANN at a Crossroads: A Proposal for Better Governance and Performance,” to the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). The submission was in response to NTIA’s Notice of Inquiry on the upcoming expiration of the Joint Project Agreement (JPA) with the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers ICANN). Lenard is President and Senior Fellow at TPI; White is Arthur E. Imperatore Professor of Economics at NYU’s Stern School of Business.

Press Releases

ICANN should be reformed “in a way that makes it truly accountable and clearly defines its scope of operations,” according to testimony delivered by TPI president and senior fellow Thomas Lenard at a hearing of the House Subcommittee on Communications, Technology and the Internet. Lenard said, “The expiration of the Joint Project Agreement (JPA) with the Department of Commerce this September provides a much-needed opportunity for a thorough evaluation of the structure, governance, and mission of ICANN.”

Commentaries and Op-Eds

The commercial use of information on the Internet has produced substantial benefits for consumers. But, as the use of information online has increased, so have concerns about privacy. This paper discusses how the use of individuals� information for commercial purposes affects consumers, and the implications of restricting information availability in the interest of privacy.

Research Papers

The commercial use of information on the Internet has produced substantial benefits for consumers. But, as the use of information online has increased, so have concerns about privacy. This paper discusses how the use of individuals� information for commercial purposes affects consumers, and the implications of restricting information availability in the interest of privacy.

Testimony and Filings

71 economists explain why the National Telecommunications and Information Administration and The Rural Utilities Service should use competitive procurement auctions to allocate the broadband stimulus grants. The economists, in comments submitted to the NTIA and RUS, explain “why procurement auctions are more efficient and more consistent with the stimulus goals of allocating funds quickly than a traditional grant review process.”

The signatories are economists who have studied telecommunications, auctions, and competition policy and include two Nobel Laureates and three winners of the John Bates Clark medal for the best economist under 40. The comments were coordinated by Paul Milgrom, Gregory Rosston, and Andrzej Skrzypacz of Stanford University, and Scott Wallsten of the Technology Policy Institute. Thomas Lenard of TPI is one of the signers of the comments.

Research Papers

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) has control over extremely important aspects of the Internet, but is largely accountable to no one, according to a new study coauthored by Thomas M. Lenard and Lawrence J. White. ICANN�s governance structure should be dramatically reformed to make it more accountable before the current tie with the U.S. Department of Commerce is allowed to expire. Lenard is President and Senior Fellow at TPI; White is Professor of Economics at the NYU Stern School of Business.

Research Papers

Electric power is one of the last major regulated industries to undergo some form of ?liberalization.? One of the most important steps has been creating regional transmission organizations (RTOs) in major regions of the country. RTOs are independent non-profit entities that operate utility-owned transmission networks. They are intended to increase competition and efficiency in the market for wholesale power, which should lead to lower wholesale prices. This paper tests whether RTOs have, in fact, achieved this goal.

Press Releases

Technology Policy Institute president and senior fellow Thomas Lenard filed comments today with the Federal Communications Commission on its proposal to auction the 2155-2175 MHz band (AWS-3) subject to rules that would require the winner to offer a basic tier of free wireless broadband service that virtually the entire U.S. population could access. The service conditions are similar to those contained in a 2006 application by M2Z to obtain this spectrum for free.

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